Category: Lee Henderson

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THE 180 Gs Singin’ To God (2018) review

With unlimited skill and patience, David Minnick, the man who created this imaginary a capella vocal group The 180 Gs (the name came from a composition from the band Negativland, called ‘A Big 10-8 Place – Part 2’) tackles the double disc music of Cardiacs ‘Sing To God’ (a 1995 stunner that many fans feel is their ultimate offering). The result is a feat nearly impossible to conceive, using anywhere from one hundred or more overdubs on each track, to generate this massive undertaking.

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Eclectic Maybe Band – The Blind Night Watchers’ Mysterious Landscapes (2018) review

An outerlimits excursion by astro travelers and gifted musicians from several prized members (or former members) of Univers Zero, Pablo’s Eye, The Wrong Object, Morton Fork Gang, and much more. You know this will be special. In short, it is elsewhere and otherwise, in a set of nine improvised compositions that spy on the other side of your brain, cheat the usual adjectives, and defy any musical boundaries.

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Six-Ring Circus – Six-Ring Circus (2018) review

From France, this highly inventive quintet has already spent three years in collaboration before releasing their debut recording. Winning prizes since 2015 (as best emerging band, best band in some events, etc), the group is as slick and classy as top shelf diner jazz, but with plenty of bumps and grinds, bravery and brilliance, and a little bit of everything. This French progressive jazz rock outfit gives off flavors of Gentle Giant, Sloche, Bill Bruford’s Earthworks

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Syrinx Call – The Moon On A Stick (2018) review

A gorgeous sophomore album by masters of expression Volker Kunke (who directed this project) and Jens Lueck (who did sound engineering and production). Both have worked together on many previous recordings other than Syrinx Call, but this and their debut ‘Wind In The Woods’ (which put a high mark on the progressive celtic/classical/art rock world), rank extremely prominent on my most loved music list of this genre.

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Soft Machine – Hidden Details (2018) review

An ambitious ascendancy by a superior revolving free jazz, avant jazz, quirky jazz rock, classical jazz fusion, whatever you call it, jazz infused progressive music praiseworthy group. Fifty years ago, the birth of this far-reaching band shook up the music world with a debut under the name The Soft Machine (taken from a William S. Burroughs novel ‘The Soft Machine’, part of The Nova Trilogy, thereafter, they shortened it to Soft Machine).

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Dwiki Dharmawan – Rumah Batu (2018) review

From the initial moments, there is euphoric beauty with flute, piano, and floating percussion, followed by nimble eastern integration with a collision of Weather Report, Il Baricentro, Arti+Mestieri, and ECM polish. So tight, so perfectly performed, it makes you jealous.

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Dialeto – Live With David Cross (2018) review

A Bartok/Crimson/Cross smorgasbord performance that must have made grown men cry, and now everyone can cry, with joy. A powerful live concert that was actually recorded in 2017 to promote Dialeto’s ‘Bartok in Rock’ album (also distributed by MoonJune in USA).

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Bernadette Zeilinger – Acoustic Solo (2018)

Austrian born Bernadette Zeilinger creates pure magic with her techniques. This is the definitin of being inventive, in its highest form and on a most elevated plateau. This is a true to the word solo, with  Ms Zeilinger producing every ounce of sound and syllable. She has taken wind instruments and voice to a new place. She can play many instruments but on this release she stays with a small collection of Contrabass Recorder, Voice Flute, and Pinkullo (a wooden flute mostly found in the Andes)

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Paul Steel – Carousel Kites : April & II (2018) review

A monster eccentric propagative art pop opus!!. Actually set up as a sequel to his 2007 ‘April & I’ release, which was his last offering to the world as a solo artist named Paul Steel, the official title became ‘Carousel Kites’ with a subtitle of such (formerly to be named ‘April & II’). It took Paul ten years to find the time and place to produce this newest gem, due to becoming a husband, father, and provider with a substantial job. After years spent in producing other artists music, and working in the commercial pop world, just to make a living, Paul has arrived once again with music he actually wants to do and has dreamed of doing since a teen. His first full length was ‘Moon Rock’ (2007) and big names such as Andy Partridge (XTC) paid attention to Paul’s talent.

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Marbin – Israeli Jazz (2018) review

Great new fusion release from band presently based in Chicago. In 2007, Marbin was founded by saxophonist Danny Markovitch and guitarist Dani Rabin who were at the time, living in Israel (where they were born). As fate would have it, they joined a band founded by Paul Wertico (well known as a member of Pat Metheny’s group).

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