Category: Lee Henderson

0

Martyn Bates – I Said To Love (2017) review

I’ve been a hooked fan of Martyn Bates since his one of a kind experimental band ‘Eyeless In Gaza’. I bought everything on vinyl (and now CD) by both his band (a brilliant and endless stream of creations unlike anything I have ever heard and suspect it will remain as such). and his solos. With this, the 16th solo work by Bates, (not counting the comps, singles, EP’s, guest appearances, and many collaborations with other artists, you would think nothing could be left, but you’d be very wrong.

  • 26
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Amy Denio – The Big Embrace (2017) review

One more (her 10th solo) totally and almost indescribable soul shaking recording by this ever talented, brilliant thinker, composer, musician, producer, organizer, world traveler, artist, and all around pleasant person. I began my musical journey with Amy Denio in the early 1990’s with her duo based (but they did add other members) Tone Dogs with bassist Fred Chalenor (Note: it was a delight to see a reunion of them at 2013 SeaProg). They played a low core, somewhat sparse, quizzical folk injected pop with avant-jazz explorations. Again, hard to describe, but something very new to the ears of the progressive music scene. Multitudes of projects, giant leaps of chance, and many recordings later, Amy gives the world another dazzling display of sixteen songs that defy a short description of any sort. Her multi-level incredible creativity and endless source of gifted reception is simply unheard of. And I ask where does she get all this energy?

  • 75
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Judith Ring – The Ring Lieder (2017) review

I first listened to Judith’s full length CD ‘What Was’ (2014) which she says is an “overview” of her work to date, and while not typical in any category, neither minimalist, avant-garde, or classical in a strict manner, the use of all three styles are often combined to wondrous effect. A fine group of artists explore Ring’s ideas and compositions with much care. Images, moods, and atmospheres are created with virtuosity.  I was eager to hear her new EP ‘The Ring Leider’, in which the only two musicians to appear from ‘What Was’ is Kate Ellis (cello) and of course Judith Ring (voice, piano, bells). The other musicians are Adrian Hart (violin), and Lisa Dowdall (viola). Judith did the marvelous cover art for both releases.

  • 35
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Security Project – Contact (2017) review

Third release, this time all live, from hybrid collection of ex-Crimson/Gabriel and ilk artists Jerry Marotta – Drums, B.Vox (played on first five Gabriel  albums), Trey Gunn – Touch Guitar, B.Vox (of King Crimson), David Jameson – Keyboards, Eigenharp,  Michael Cozzi – Guitar, B. Vox (from Shriekback), and the newly added ultra-gifted and brilliant multi octave female vocalist Happy Rhodes (Voice, vocals).

  • 3
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

How Far to Hitchin – Easy Targets (2016) review

How Far To Hitchin is a debut project by British composer/vocalist/illustrator/producer Paul Dews. Fellow musicians are E.P. Dulsaw (acoustic & electric guitars, ukulele) Saul Pewd (keyboards), Wes Padpu (bass), and Ade W. Puls (flute, drum programming, percussion). This has a lot of styles but is interwoven with progressive and art rock. ‘Easy Targets’ instantly reminded me of some of Peter Hammill’s solo work (or even VDGG) only not near so depressing or doomsday oriented. But listening to song after song, the comparisons got wider and more diverse. Touches of Steve Hackett’s more acoustic work also quickly came to mind.

  • 24
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Jon Durant – Parting Is (2018) review

If ever any set of compositions deserved to be the definition of beautiful, it is ‘Parting Is’ by long time guitarist (multi-instrumentalist) and composer Jon Durant. Jon describes this as his most personal solo (and this is all done by him and him alone) yet. He lists his chosen instruments on each song and they include ‘cloud guitar’, electric 12 string guitar, fretless guitar, fretless bass, and electric guitar. The arrangements are paramount.

  • 28
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Oteme – Il Corpo Nel Sogno (2018) review

OTEME’s (Observatory of Emerged Lands) third jewel (translated to English ‘The Body in the Dream’) brings yet more of this unique blend of avant RIO elements and progressive pop. ‘Il Corpo Nel Sogno’  continues in the supreme stirring together or alternating simple Canterbury vocal pop gems with avant garde brilliant chamber orchestra, even bigger, better, and with more shine than ever.

  • 4
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Johannes Luley – Qitara (2017) review

Presented to you is a 11 song (47+ minutes) 2017 solo that is mixed, mastered, produced, and composed (with exception to trk 7 ‘Red and Orange’ by Jan Hammer, and trk 8 ‘Faces in Reflection’ by George Duke) by masterful guitarist Johannes Luley. With a fairly long career beginning with the electronic synth-pop outfit Few Boys (they only released a single ‘Secret Times’ 1985) he quickly made his way to a far more progressive rock world with two bands (Moth Vellum and Perfect Beings). He also has a previous solo ‘Tales From Sheepfather’s Grove’, but all former projects are different than his newest adventure ‘Qitara’.

  • 6
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Existence – Origins (2017) review

Led by Alan Charles, this is a double CD that is the result of the debut release of the band not being able to properly complete their intended project from 1992. The composing of material actually began in 1987. Remakes of songs from that single disc version, with additions for the two disc set, brings Existence to the most accomplished and refined they have ever sounded. While in the progressive genre, it has a strong traditional folk presence at the beginning, with plenty of violin and rock energy. It is what I would classify as progressive folk rock, with fusion of theatre, ballad rock and even classical. The recording is a concept work and the vocals/lyrics tell a story throughout the compositions. The two sides are divided into two subtitles, CD 1: Fragile Whisperings Of Innocence (which has 7 songs) and CD 2: Silent Screams In Violence (which has 6 songs).

  • 6
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
0

Single Celled Organism – Splinter In The Eye (2017) review

This is the latest release from Jens Lueck featuring his partner Isgaard on vocals, Jan Petersen – Electric Guitars, Ingo Salzmann – Electric Guitars, Dieter Koch – Acoustic Guitars, additional Electric Guitars, Volker Kuinke – Recorders, Katja Flintsch – Violine, Viola, Annika Stolze – Cello also with John Turner (voice on ‘The Call’), Kai Ritter – voice, Ekiss Giloc – bass, and everything else by Jens Lueck – drums, keyboards, bass, programing, vocals, all compositions, (except main theme melody line for the character of the female protagonist, written by his daughter Marie-Jean Lueck), arrangements, production, recording, mix, and mastering – whew!

  • 7
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •