Monthly Archive: November 2017

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ONEMENT9 – The Third Kind (2017) review

Jason Weekes produces his debut solo with ‘The Third Kind’ under the name Onement9. With a long list of musical influences and education, Jason plays keyboards, drums, bass, electronic tambura, trumpets, tambourine, electric guitar, flute, computer voice, custom maracas, and field recordings. This concept album starts off (‘Good Mornin’ Britain!’) with a very tropical theme, loads of various bird calls, and celestial keyboards with drumkit. It has a meditation feel. The following track (‘Tory Breakfast News’) is very different with tribal drums, roosters, and general chaos. A story line is printed on back of the CD which I’d highly suggest the listener read before, so you can pay attention to the music at hand. You’ll be quick to realize much of this is a politically charged set of compositions.

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Monarch Trail – Sand (2017) review

Following nicely after the debut ‘Skye’ (2014) this is Monarch Trail’s second release. Being Ken Baird’s project, he does all the words and music. Throughout, the use of lush and nimble keys, some nice acoustic and lead guitar, tight drums, and exceptional vocals, make this a huge recommendation for Camel and other similar music fans. Although Ken performs on keyboards, vocals, and guitar (track 5), he has three guests on guitar (John Mamone, Kelly Kereliuk, and Steve Cochrane) plus his bandmates Dino Verginella on bass and Chris Lamont on drums.

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Smells Like – Aranis (2017)

When a band I have put on a throne for their immaculate series of recordings of various original chamber music styles, including avant and cover songs from other Belgian composers, announces they are doing an entire album of cover tunes by Nirvana (the Seattle grunge band of the 90’s), I got a fear in my soul. This brilliant band who could do no wrong really startled me. I will admit right here that I am not at all a fan of Nirvana, with the exception of being okay with the hit song ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’, since I was young when that hit the stations and it attracted me due to the contrasting mellow parts and then heavy chorus. So with very mixed feelings I began listening to Aranis’s new 2017 release titled ‘Smells Like’.

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United Ubiquity of Flesh – Salim Ghazi Saeedi (2017) review

New solo by guitarist/programmer/composer/producer/engineer artist begins gentle and builds into a prog metal/Middle Eastern King Crimson sound. Out of the eleven all instrumental compositions, some have a sense of exploring improvisation. ‘United Ubiquity of Flesh’ is the most calm music I’ve heard from Salim, although there is plenty of punch and quick paced parts mixed in. This is possibly due to his move from Iran to Australia, which seems to have resulted in Salim’s more relaxed state of mind and music. The combination of a more loose feel and tight execution of the songs are compelling and introspective.

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This Way North interview

I have a peculiar approach toward new music myself. My mind is mostly progressive rock oriented but my music listening ranges from jazz and classical music to funeral doom metal (this one is a recent Adelaide discovery, Mournful Congregation). So this is why whenever I want to think of my favourite genre of music, I just can think of one genre; “good music”. I was strolling in Brisbane’s CBD, Queen St and two young artists grabbed my attention. This Way North. Being a duo definitely makes their creative forces to go beyond conventional genres. This is why I immediately felt an affinity with them. But more precisely Leisha’s guitar soloing sounded like Jeff Beck’s. Maybe I just stopped by because of that! Visit This Way North’s website atĀ www.thiswaynorth.com

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Lara – Lara (2017) review

This self titled debut by singer and multi instrumentalist (flute, guitar, & percussion) from Antwerp, Belgium is a gorgeous display of Lara’s talent. Accompanied by Nicolas Dechene(musical arrangments, guitars, bass, baritone & glockenspeil), Tristan Driessens (oud), Erno le Menthole, Lucas Lovinfosse & Amiro Moerenhout (backing vocals) and Etienne Plummer (drums, percussion, the music spreads like gentle seeds over a genre of various world music, covering eastern, jazz, classical, folk, pop and unique fusions. Two of the songs are based on poems. ‘Prayer For Land’ (track 2) is from Thich Nhot Hanh and ‘Survive’ (track 9) is from William Blake.

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Band of Rain – The Dust of Stars (2017) Review

Six years after his last release (‘Sun In VIII’ – 2011) British composer and musician Chris Gill put together a team of bandmates, artists, and technical helpers for the finest recording yet by Band Of Rain. While some might call it progressive rock, I’d add a very liberal dose of world fusion to the description of this ‘Dust of Stars’ platter. While it does have a couple of slight nods to the heavier moments of Porcupine Tree, it adds many textures that may remind listeners of the floating tunes of Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour and even a touch of Alan Parsons Project. But that’s just a taste of it. The last cut made me think of an exotic post rock band with Vangelis on keyboards.

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